Variable vs Adjustable Rate Mortgage

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Variable vs Adjustable Rate Mortgage

Did you know there are two types of mortgages whose interest rate can change as per the change in the lending institutions prime rate? That’s right, the two types are the Variable Rate Mortgage and the Adjustable Rate Mortgage.

You now might be asking what is the difference between a variable vs adjustable rate mortgage. In this post we provide a general overview of each one and hopefully provide a clear explanation to your question what is the difference between a variable vs adjustable rate mortgage.

variable vs adjustable rate mortgage

Adjustable Rate Mortgage – ARM

Payments automatically adjust with changes in the prime rate of the lending institution your mortgage is with to ensure that you maintain the original amortization schedule of your mortgage. The rate varies during the term of the adjustable rate mortgage.

The interest rate can change from time to time because it changes when the prime rate changes.

If your adjustable rate mortgage interest rate decreases, the payment amount also decreases..

If your interest rate rises, the mortgage payment amount will also increase.

One advantage of this product is you can have the ability to potentially lower, short-term interest rates.

 

Variable Rate Mortgage – VRM

The main difference with a variable vs adjustable rate mortgage is that the mortgage payments with the variable product remains fixed for the duration of the term; as the interest rate changes with any fluctuations in the prime rate. If the prime rate decreases, more of the mortgage payment will go towards paying off the principal; if the prime rate increases, more of the mortgage payment will go towards interest costs.

Your amortization period (number of years to repay the mortgage) may vary and be longer if rates have risen or be shorter if rates have fallen since the start of the term.

 

With both the Variable Rate Mortgage and the Adjustable Rate Mortgage you can always convert your mortgage into a fixed rate mortgage should you feel that the prime rate is rising or don’t have the tolerance anymore of rate fluctuations. Most of the time, the variable and adjustable interest rates are lower than the fixed rates.

If you still are not sure of which one is better or what the main differences are between a variable vs adjustable rate mortgage we encourage you to contact us with your questions and we would be happy to answer them. You may also like to add your remarks and questions in the comment section below.

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Bank of Canada Interest Rate Announcement 6 Mar 2013

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Bank of Canada Interest Rate Announcement 6 Mar 2013

Today the Bank of Canada announced interest rate announcement was release. The Bank of Canada is maintaining its target for the overnight rate at 1 per cent and the Bank Rate is correspondingly 1 1/4 per cent and the deposit rate is 3/4 per cent.

Here is a summary of the key points from the announcement: Bank of Canada

1) The global economic outlook is broadly consistent with the Bank’s projection in its January Monetary Policy Report (MPR).

2) Canada’s economy grew by 0.6 per cent at annual rates in the fourth quarter of 2012. The Bank expects growth in Canada to pick up through 2013, supported by modest growth in household spending combined with a recovery in exports and solid business investment.

3) Total CPI inflation has been somewhat more subdued than projected in the January MPR as a result of weaker core inflation and lower mortgage interest costs. Low core inflation reflects muted price pressures across a wide range of goods and services, consistent with material excess capacity in the economy.

4) Reflecting all of these factors, the Bank has decided to maintain the target for the overnight rate at 1 per cent.  The considerable monetary policy stimulus currently in place will likely remain appropriate for a period of time, after which some modest withdrawal will likely be required, consistent with achieving the 2 per cent inflation target.

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