Low Interest Rates Good Reason to Lower Debt

Low Interest Rates Good Reason to Lower Debt

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Low Interest Rates Good Reason to Lower Debt

In a press release on February 6, 2015 Lucie Tedesco Commissioner Financial Consumer Agency of Canada stated that just because interest rates have gone down, referring to the recent Bank of Canada decision to lower the overnight rate, does not mean that Canadians “should take on more debt.” In fact the low interest rates good reason to lower debt.

 

Low Interest Rates Good Reason to Lower Debt
picture courtesy of the Financial Post

To many mortgagers (owing money borrowed on real estate) or those with loans whose payments are calculated based on the Prime rate, which in turn is calculated on the Bank of Canada’s overnight rate, low interest rates can be a double edged sword. Especially if you can’t control your spending; however if you are able to curve your appetite for borrowing, then for you low interest rates good reason to lower debt as you can pay more towards your principal and less towards interest payments.

Commissioner Tedesco went on to say that “Canadians should look at this low interest-rate environment as an opportunity to pay debt down, rather than to accumulate more, even for a larger house, a newer car or a winter vacation.” We should be realistic and be ready for when interest rates will increase.

For its part the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada has developed tools and resources to assist the consumer with managing their debt obligations and can be found at “How to Beat that Debt.”

To read the full press release from Lucie Tedesco Commissioner Financial Consumer Agency of Canada click here.

Trusterra Mortgage is here to help. If you currently have a mortgage and are considering to consolidate your debt, or want to get the lower interest rates that are available currently, contact us to see what options are available for you and we’ll assess your current financial situation to see whether it is worth it for you to break your mortgage to refinance it or not.

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Bank of Canada Rate Cut

Bank of Canada Rate Cut

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Bank of Canada Rate Cut

The Bank of Canada rate cut could be just around the corner. Analysts are predicting that due to the not-so good Canadian economy outlook, there is the possibility the Bank of Canada rate cut could be more real than fiction at its next interest rate announcement on March 4, 2015.

It was the surprise of the year, and we’ve barely started the new year, when the Governor of the Bank of Canada Stephen Poloz announced last week on Wednesday January 21 that they were lowering the key lending interest rate. Not to our surprise, this week Chartered Banks and other institutional lenders begin dropping their prime lending rate in response to the Bank of Canada’s rate cut. The Prime Rate is now at 2.85%.

Bank of Canada rate cut
picture courtesy of CBC

There are several indicators confirming the poor performance of the Canadian economy, such as the Statistics Canada labor market revisions, big 6 banks not lowering their prime rate equal to the Bank of Canada’s rate cut by 25 basis points and only lowering theirs by 15 basis points and another worry is the drop in oil prices which the Bank of Canada suggests is their main concern that could potentially get worse and impact not only the Alberta economy which is largely based on the oil sand productions, but also to resonate nation wide.

 

It’s a wait and see game at this point. After all, in the past 5 years there were many naysayers and predictions with what will happen with the prime lending rate, but at the end it never changed until 5 years later, and to our surprise, it went down instead of up.

What are your thoughts about the recent Bank of Canada rate cut, and future ones? How do you feel the Canadian economy is doing right now and where will we be next year this time?

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Variable Rate vs Fixed Rate Mortgage

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Variable Rate vs Fixed Rate Mortgage

This is probably one of the most popular and famous questions of all times in the real estate mortgage financing world; variable rate vs fixed rate mortgage. Which one is better? or Which one is worse? How do you decide which mortgage product is good for you?

variable rate vs fixed rate mortgage

To look at variable rate vs fixed rate mortgage as a question for your own good would be right for everyone depending on their own unique needs and tolerances.

A fixed rate mortgage has a rate guaranty for the term of the mortgage. For example, if you get the 5 year closed fixed rate, then, you are guaranteed to hold on to your rate for the full five years without it changing. There is a sense of security and closure for you knowing that you don’t have to worry about the fixed rate changing during the life of your mortgage term.  Even if you are an investor of real estate, this type of a mortgage can be beneficial to you because you know exactly what the interest rate will be and can calculate your R.O.I. accurately and work into your formula other expenses, which would allow you to know exactly what your net income could be each year. One down side to a fixed rate mortgage is the fact that if you ever decide to break the term / contract in the middle of it, the penalty can be significantly higher than if you were to break a variable mortgage.

A variable rate mortgage many times starts with a much lower interest rate than its counterpart fixed term rate. The variable interest rate is a discount that you would get from the lender against it’s prime lending rate. For those who are not tolerant of minor rate adjustments throughout the term of a variable rate mortgage, this product might not be your cup of tea. Currently the Bank of Canada has not changed its stance on the prime lending rate and it has not changed since September 9, 2010. However, the lenders have changed their discounts off of the prime rate. Several years ago you could have been approved for a variable rate as low as Prime minus .90%. Since then the current average discount for the closed variable rate is Prime -.50%. If you are planning to break your mortgage in the middle of its term, the penalty for the closed variable rate mortgage is three months interest payments, which for the majority of the time comes out a lot less than if you were to break a closed fixed rate mortgage that uses a formula called interest rate differential to calculate the penalty amount.

However, overall, statistics have shown that you can save more money if you go with a variable rate vs fixed rate mortgage. As of the date of writing this post the 5 year fixed closed mortgage is 2.99% and the 5 year closed variable mortgage is Prime -.50% = 2.50%.

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Will Bank of Canada Lower Interest Rates

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Will Bank of Canada Lower Interest Rates

On Wednesday, 16 July 2014, the Bank of Canada will announce its decision on the target for the overnight rate. What do you think will happen tomorrow, will Bank of Canada Lower Interest Rates, or will they stay the same, or even go up?

Since September 2010 the Bank of Canada has not changed it’s overnight lending rate, and we must wonder if the rate will be moving up at some point, if not now, when? As the Bank of Canada’s overnight lending rate remains untouched, the Canadian Chartered Banks and other lending institutions maintain their Prime lending rate at 3.00%.

The Governor of the Bank of Canada Mr. Stephen Poloz and his team of advisers working at the Bank of Canada must look at many variables and factors affecting the Canadian economy and based on that decide if it is timely to raise or lower the interest rate.

If we were to make any predictions, it would be towards the decision being one of maintaining the overnight rate the same and not touching it. However, in his previous interest rate announcement Mr. Poloz did give hints that they are not ruling out a rate decrease either.

It will be interesting to see what happens tomorrow. What do you think will happen, will Bank of Canada lower interest rates?

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 Will the Bank of Canada Lower Interest Rates

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Bank of Canada maintains overnight rate

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Bank of Canada maintains overnight rate

The Bank of Canada maintains overnight rate at 1 per cent.

This morning in a press release the Bank of Canada announced that it will maintain its target for the overnight rate at 1 per cent, and correspondingly keeping the Bank Rate at 1 1/4 per cent and the deposit rate at 3/4 per cent.

In the press release which can be read in full by clicking this ‘LINK’ the Bank of Canada mentioned that the “total CPI inflation has moved up to around the 2 per cent target, sooner than anticipated in the Bank’s April Monetary Policy Report (MPR), largely due to the temporary effects of higher energy prices and exchange rate pass-through.” They went on to say that the “core inflation remains significantly below 2 per cent although it has drifted up slightly, partly owing to past exchange rate movements.”

 

Bank of Canada maintains overnight rate

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